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Sustainable City

Chandler Demonstrates its Commitment to Building Green

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Four projects in Chandler are illustrating that the suburban Phoenix city is going green.

The design for the $12.9-million Ironwood Hall includes protective outdoor spaces and a sculptural steel bridge that connects to an adjacent building.
Photo: Image courtesy Architekton
The design for the $12.9-million Ironwood Hall includes protective outdoor spaces and a sculptural steel bridge that connects to an adjacent building.
Built under budget, Javelina Hall is aiming for LEED silver and includes many sustainable elements including shade structures and occupancy sensors.
Photo: Color Repro Consulting Inc.
Built under budget, Javelina Hall is aiming for LEED silver and includes many sustainable elements including shade structures and occupancy sensors.
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Two of the projects are on the original campus of Chandler-Gilbert Community College at Pecos and Gilbert roads. The 3,991-sq-ft Javelina Hall, a classroom and office building, opened for the fall semester, and the two-story, 62,948-sq-ft Ironwood Hall, a classroom and laboratory building, should open on schedule in November.

The 8,862-sq-ft Chandler CARE Center, 777 E. Galveston St., a health care and human-services project, is scheduled to open Jan. 11, and the largest project, the 131,000-sq-ft Chandler City Hall, is on track to open in fall 2010.

“Chandler is committed to green building, and we’re leading by example,” says Mayor Boyd W. Dunn. “We know the decisions we’re making today will have a long lasting, positive impact on Chandler for years to come.”

Chandler-Gilbert Community College

At CGCC, Javelina and Ironwood halls — as well as the earlier LEED-certified Jacaranda — reaffirm the school’s commitment to sustainable construction. The two most recent buildings are in accord with the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment, which targets climate-neutral campuses by 2030.

At CGCC, Javelina and Ironwood halls — as well as the earlier LEED-certified Jacaranda — reaffirm the school’s commitment to sustainable construction. The two most recent buildings are in accord with the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment, which targets climate-neutral campuses by 2030.

CGCC was the first of the 10 Maricopa County Community College District schools to sign this voluntary agreement. It’s now mandating that its campus buildings attain at least LEED silver or equivalent.

Javelina and Ironwood halls offer tangible evidence for CGCC’s continuing pursuit of improved sustainability techniques in construction planning, campus management and LEED-certification objectives,” says Bruce Scharbach, director of facilities services for the school.

Javelina Hall, which is going for LEED silver, was constructed under budget for $559,792 (not including furnishings), says Gary R. Eberhard, RA, architect-district project manager for MCCCD and project manager for both halls. The building was designed by Phoenix-based Gabor Lorant Architects and built by D.L. Withers Construction, Phoenix. Construction began March 10.

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